A new insight on a mechanism of airborne and underwater sound of a drop impacting a liquid surface - Archive ouverte HAL Accéder directement au contenu
Article Dans Une Revue Physics of Fluids Année : 2020

A new insight on a mechanism of airborne and underwater sound of a drop impacting a liquid surface

(1, 2) , (3) , (2) , (2) , (1)
1
2
3

Résumé

We report on an experimental study of the impact of a water drop on a liquid surface in the regime of the so-called irregular entrainment. The hydrodynamics of the phenomenon has been correlated finely to the features of the acoustic signal, both underwater and in the air, thanks to the synchronization of images and sounds in a home-made setup. If the origin of the acoustic signal is known to be caused by the capture of a bubble during the hydrodynamic flow following the impact, for the first time, a new mechanism responsible for the formation of the air bubble is highlighted. The latter is caused by the closing, like a liquid zipper, of the cavity induced by the retraction of the Rayleigh jet, by a secondary droplet detached from this jet. The comparison of the experimental data with the Minnaert model and plane wave theories reveals: (i) the time-dependence of the instantaneous oscillation frequency, (ii) a dominant frequency about 30% higher than the Minnaert prediction, (iii) a higher damping characteristic time, and (iv) a two orders of magnitude higher water–air transmission coefficient. All these results can be explained by the proximity of the bubble to the air–water interface, and by the too small dimensions of the tank to avoid underwater echoes in the measured underwater signal.
Fichier non déposé

Dates et versions

hal-02994901 , version 1 (08-11-2020)

Identifiants

Citer

G. Gillot, C. Derec, Jean-Michel Génevaux, Laurent Simon, L. Benyahia. A new insight on a mechanism of airborne and underwater sound of a drop impacting a liquid surface. Physics of Fluids, 2020, 32 (6), pp.062004. ⟨10.1063/5.0010464⟩. ⟨hal-02994901⟩
34 Consultations
0 Téléchargements

Altmetric

Partager

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More